Thursday, April 30, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (viii)

INT. ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY--DAY

Jim walks up to female LIBRARY CLERK who sits behind registration desk.

JIM: I'd like to apply for a library card.

LIBRARY CLERK: Have you ever had a library card before?

JIM: Not at this library. I just moved to Ann Arbor a few days ago.

Library Clerk hands Jim application.

LIBRARY CLERK: Here's the application for you to fill out. And there's a 50 cents registration charge. You'll get a permanent library card in the mail in a few days.

JIM: Can I take out any books today?

LIBRARY CLERK: You can take out two books. We'll issue you a temporary card to use today, after you finish filling out the application.

JIM: That's great.

C.U. of Application.

Jim fills application out, enters name "Jim Wilson" in the appropriate space and writes down his Ann Arbor address on the appropriate line. Then Jim hands application back to Library Clerk, along with two quarters. Library Clerk glances at application and walks over to manual typewriter on small table behind registration desk, sits down and prepares to type.

LIBRARY CLERK: Is your legal name--"Jim"--or "James"?

JIM: "Jim." Everyone's called me "Jim" since I was a child. That's my legal name.

Library Clerk types out temporary library card for Jim, then walks back to registration desk.

LIBRARY CLERK (smiles): Here you are, Mr. Wilson.

Library Clerk hands Jim temporary library card.

JIM: Thanks.

Jim walks over to music book section of library and pulls out a Bob Dylan songbook from shelf. He checks book out at library checkout center and leaves library.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (vii)

INT. GROCERY STORE--NIGHT

Jim purchases a sandwich and an orange juice from a smiling BEARDED CASHIER who has long-hair. Store is crowded with long-haired and bearded young men and dressed-down young women who don't wear make-up or lipstick.

BEARDED CASHIER: That'll be $1.75.

INT. JOSEPH PLACE HOUSE--NIGHT

As Jim is about to enter his room with his bag of food, he bumps into JOEY, 22, on the second floor. Joey is tall, long-haired and beardless. He smiles at Jim.

JOEY: Welcome! I'm Joey.

Jim smiles and nods.

JIM: I'm Jim.

JOEY: How about coming upstairs to smoke some weed with me?

JIM: O.K. I'll be right up.

JOEY: Catch you later, then.

Joey opens door in hall and walks upstairs to attic apartment.

INT. ATTIC--NIGHT

Joey and Jim are laughing, in-between sharing joints. A Rolling Stones record plays in the background.

JIM: What do you think of the students around here?

JOEY: They're good customers. But they don't party as much as they do at Michigan State. And some of them are rich and snotty.

JIM: How do you like the landlord?

JOEY: He's cool. He stays downstairs and never comes up here. And he lets me do my thing.

JIM: Your grass beats what they're selling in New York City these days. Too bad I don't have the bread to buy some of it from you.

JOEY: That's O.K.. I get enough business from the students to keep me living high. And downstairs would probably get uptight if I started dealing weed to his tenants.

Jim stands up.

JIM: Well, thanks for inviting me up here.

JOEY: Catch you later, brother!

INT. JIM'S ROOM--NIGHT

Smashed, Jim takes out his guitar from its case and sits down on the mattress in the room. He begins to sing loudly.

JIM (sings):

They call him Public Enemy Number One
They say he's done wrong, they seem to want him hung
For many, many months he's been fast on the run
It sure is fun being Public Enemy Number One.

John Dillinger was Public Enemy Number One
Like Billy the Kid, he learned to use his gun
They jailed him 10 years for robbing a small sum
It's better than working, being Public Enemy Number One.

The women are all in love with Public Enemy Number One
Whenever he's around, they each give him a hug
The sheriff and his posse, they often are quite stunned
For they can't seem to locate Public Enemy Number One.

The courtroom is waiting for Public Enemy Number One
They've listed all the crimes, the bankers say he's done
To protect their stocks and bonds, they've spilt a lot of blood
Yet seriosuly they still hunt for Public Enemy Number One.

He sure does confuse me, Public Enemy Number One
He seems very friendly and full of lots of love
I hope they don't kill him for being kind to bums
He seems so symbolic, this Public Enemy Number one

Yes, they call him--


Loud KNOCKING on door startles Jim. He quickly stops singing and puts guitar down on the mattress. Loud knocking continues. Jim stands up, walks to door slowly.

JIM (CONT'D): Who's there?

Silence for a second.

LANDLORD (O.S.): It's the landlord! Open up!

Jim opens door. Landlord is standing outside door with irritated expression.

LANDLORD (CONT'D): If you want to live here, you can't play that guitar so loud at this time of night!

JIM: Oh. Excuse me. I didn't realize sound carried so far in this house. it won't happen again.

LANDLORD: Well, be sure that it doesn't! Because my wife and I can't sleep with that kind of noise.

Landlord closes door and goes back downstairs. Jim smiles and starts to put his guitar back in its case.

EXT. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS--DAY

Maloney and Kelly walk across Low Plaza on Columbia University's campus and up the stairs in front of Low Library Administration Building. Groups of students, dressed the same way as the U. of Michigan students in Ann Arbor, walk by them in both directions, but do not notice them. After reaching the top of the stairs in front of Low Library, Maloney and Kelly walk towards Columbia's Engineering School Building.

EXT. ENGINEERING SCHOOL BUILDING--DAY

Maloney and Kelly stop in front of Engineering School Building.

KELLY: His office should be in this building.

INT. ENGINEERING SCHOOL BUILDING LOBBY--DAY

Maloney and Kelly walk towards building directory by elevator. They search the directory for the name they're looking for. Their eyes focus on "Professor Samuel Levine, Professor of Industrial Engineering, Room 425."

KELLY (V.O.): Professor Samuel Levine, Room 425. That's him.

MALONEY: Let's see if the professor is in his office.

Kelly presses elevator button, door opens and they enter. Elevator door closes.

INT. ENGINEERING SCHOOL BUILDING HALLWAY--DAY

Maloney and Kelly walk down hallway. They stop in front of Room 425. Door to room is open.

INT. PROFESSOR LEVINE'S OFFICE--DAY

PROFESSOR LEVINE, 58, wears a suit, tie and glasses. His office is filled with hundreds of books on its shelves. Walls are decorated with anti-war posters. He is sitting at his desk, reading the New York Times, when Maloney and Kelly enter his office.

KELLY (O.S.): Professor Levine?

PROFESSOR LEVINE: Yes?

KELLY: We're from the FBI. And we'd like to speak with you.

Kelly flashes his FBI I.D. card.

PROFESSOR LEVINE: Get out of my office. I have nothing to say to you.

KELLY: We're looking for James Greenberg. He wrote you an open letter in the student newspaper. You know where he's hiding.

PROFESSOR LEVINE: I said get out of my office.

MALONEY: Look, Professor. James Greenberg knows where the Weather fugitives are. And we'd like your cooperation in locating the Weather fugitives.

PROFESSOR LEVINE: If you're not out of my office by the time I count to ten, I'm calling campus security. One, two, three...

Maloney shrugs and motions to Kelly to leave.

MALONEY: O.K. Professor. I guess we'll have to come back with a grand jury subpoena the next time we visit you.

Kelly follows Maloney out of the office.

EXT. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS--DAY

Maloney and Kelly walk in front of Low Library and through Low Plaza.

MALONEY: I think we should teach that commie professor a lesson.

Kelly nods.

KELLY: I'll ask O'Connor to do a nighttime--"investigation"--of his office next month. The professor won't be too happy after O'Connor gets through--"searching through"--all those books in his office. For--"notes from the Weather fugitives."

Maloney chuckles.

EXT. COLUMBIA STUDENT UNION BUILDING--DAY

Maloney and Kelly stand in front of Ferris Booth Hall, the Columbia Student Union Building, while students walk in and out.

KELLY: The student newspaper office is up on the 3rd floor.

INT. COLUMBIA SPECTATOR STUDENT NEWSPAPER OFFICE--DAY

LOUISE, 21, the student editor, wears glasses. She is sitting behind a desk, reading copy. EDDIE, 19, a beardless student reporter with short hair, walks up to Louise.

EDDIE: Hey, Louise! We received another open letter from that Greenberg guy. What should I do with it?

LOUISE: That guy doesn't give up, does he? Doesn't he know students at Columbia don't give a fuck about the Weather fugitives? He doesn't realize that we're living in the '70s now. Not the '60s.

EDDIE: It looks like he's living in Ann Arbor now. According to the postmark on the envelope.

LOUISE: Well, whether he's in Ann Arbor or at Kent State, I have absolutely no interest in printing any more of his stuff in Spectator. You might as well throw anymore stuff you receive from him in the basket right away.

Eddie walks towards the office trash basket.

LOUISE (CONT'D): Oh, Eddie!

Eddie turns around.

LOUISE (CONT'D): I wanted to talk to you about covering the James Taylor concert next week.

EDDIE: James Taylor? I'll let you know tomorrow if I can do it.

Eddie dumps the open letter and envelope from Greenberg in the trash basket. Maloney and Kelly enter the office.

LOUISE: May I help you?

KELLY: We're from the FBI.

Kelly flashes his FBI I.D. card.

KELLY (CONT'D): And we'd like to speak with the editor.

LOUISE: FBI? I'm the editor. But people at Spectator don't speak to the FBI. We're a newspaper for students. Not for providing information to cops.

KELLY: But if your newspaper is just for students, then why did you publish that open letter from James Greenberg? He's not a student at Columbia anymore.

LOUISE: Get the fuck out of here! We don't have to explain to you why we publish anything. Didn't you ever hear of freedom of the press?

MALONEY: Watch your mouth, girl. Or we may decide to slap a subpoena on you.

LOUISE: Don't call me "girl." I'm a woman. Not a "girl."

MALONEY: I'll call you whatever I like.

KELLY: Let's calm down. We're looking for the Weather fugitives. James Greenberg knows where the Weather fugitives are. And Spectator must know where James Greenberg is hiding.

LOUISE: Eddie! Could you please telephone our lawyer and tell him we want the FBI to get the fuck out of our newsroom?

Eddie dials telephone.

EDDIE: Hello, operator? May I have the phone number for William Kunstler?

MALONEY: O.K. We'll go now. But don't print anymore open letters from Greenberg. Or we'll be back.

Eddie writes down a number.

Maloney turns to Kelly.

MALONEY (CONT'D): Let's go.

Maloney and Kelly leave office.

EDDIE: Should I call Kunstler?

LOUISE: No. Not yet. As long as we don't print any stuff from Greenberg in Spectator, they probably won't be back. That's what they really want out of us.

EDDIE: Do you want me to write a news story about their visit?

LOUISE: Yeah. Mention that the FBI visited us to ask about the Weather fugitives. But don't mention specific details. I don't want them to suspect we might really know where this Greenberg guy is hiding out. Then they might start intercepting our mail at the post office.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (vi)

EXT. INTERSTATE HIGHWAY--NIGHT

Bus passes sign which says "Ann Arbor--10 Miles."

INT. BUS--NIGHT

Jim and Student are talking to each other and laughing.

EXT. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN CAMPUS--NIGHT

Bus drives past U. of Michigan campus.

EXT. DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR--NIGHT

Bus drives through Downtown Ann Arbor. A snow flurry begins.

INT. ANN ARBOR BUS STATION--NIGHT

Jim gets his guitar case and duffle bag from bottom of bus. He waves goodbye to Student.

EXT. DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR STREET--NIGHT--SNOWING

Jim stands in front of bus stations. He notices flashing neon sign a few blocks away which says "Motel-Vacancy" and walks toward motel.

INT. MOTEL RECEPTION AREA--NIGHT

An elderly man, MOTEL RECEPTIONIST, sits behind desk, reading newspaper. Jim approaches desk. Clock on wall indicates its 7:45. Motel Receptionist looks up from newspaper.

JIM: I'd like a room for the night.

Frowning, Motel Receptionist stands up and hands registration form to Jim.

MOTEL RECEPTIONIST (gruffly): We don't accept checks. And you'll have to pay us in advance. In cash.

Jim smiles.

JIM: How much?

MOTEL RECEPTIONIST: Twenty for the night.

Jim hands a twenty-dollar bill to Motel Receptionist. The Motel Receptionist hands Jim a pen.

MOTEL RECEPTIONIST (CONT'D): Just fill out your name and address on the registration form. Check-out time is eleven o'clock. Your room is Number 8. On the 2nd floor.

C.U. OF REGISTRATION FORM

Jim prints "Jim Wilson" on line over "Name" and "320 E. 6th St., New York, NY" on line over "Address".

Motel Receptionist hands Jim key and Jim carries duffle bag and guitar case upstairs.

INT. MOTEL ROOM--NIGHT

Jim dumps guitar case and duffle bag on the bed and quickly exits from room.

EXT. DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR STREET--NIGHT

No longer snowing. As Jim walks closer to University of Michigan campus, sidewalk fills-up with students. Many of the men have beards and long hair.

EXT. STUDENT UNION BUILDING--NIGHT

Jim glances at Student Union Building entrance.

INT. STUDENT UNION BUILDING LOBBY--NIGHT

Jim walks inside lobby, past students who are hanging out there, until he reaches a newsstand. He purchases a newspaper, sits down on sofa in lobby and quickly turns to classified ads. After circling a few ads, he walks into a nearby telephone booth and dials.

JIM: Hello?...I'm calling about the room you advertised...Sixty dollars a month?...Can I come over and look at it now?...What's the address? 800 Joseph Place? How do I get there from the student union if I'm walking?...I see...I see. O.K. I'll be right over.

Jim hangs up phone.

EXT. JOSEPH PLACE HOUSE--NIGHT

House was built in 1920s and has 3 stories. Jim rings bell.

INT. JOSEPH PLACE HOUSE--NIGHT

Bearded, short-haired LANDLORD, 35, husky and tall, stands in front of Jim.

JIM: I'm here to look at the room for rent. I spoke with you on the phone.

Landlord quickly glances at Jim and smiles.

LANDLORD: It's on the second floor. In front. Follow me.

They walk up the stairs.

LANDLORD (CONT'D): The bathroom is at the end of the hall. And the shower is in the basement.

Landlord unlocks room #6.

INT. ROOM--NIGHT

Room contains mattress on the floor, desk, dresser, chair and mirror.

JIM: It looks fine to me. Is it O.K. if I move in tomorrow?

LANDLORD (smiles): If you pay me the rent and a month's security now, in cash, you can move in here tonight.

Jim takes out six $20 bills from his wallet.

LANDLORD (CONT'D): Let's go downstairs and I'll give you a set of keys and a rent receipt.

INT. LANDLORD'S APARTMENT--NIGHT

Landlord writes out a rent receipt at his desk.

LANDLORD: What's your name again?

JIM: Wilson. Jim Wilson.

Jim hands Landlord the $120 and the Landlord quickly counts it.

LANDLORD: Here's your receipt. And here's the key to your room. All the mail gets put on that table.

Landlord points to table in hallway outside his apartment.

JIM (smiles): That's easy to remember. I'll be moving in tomorrow morning.

EXT. JOSEPH PLACE HOUSE--DAY

Jim carries duffle bag and guitar case into house.

INT. JIM'S ROOM--DAY

Jim dumps duffle bag and guitar case on mattress and quickly leaves room.

EXT. CAMPUS AREA--DAY

Jim explores streets surrounding the campus with a big smile on his face. He walks in and out of a few bookstores and a record store. He glances at posters and flyers which advertise various events. In their winter clothes, large numbers of students also walk on campus area streets.

Eventually, Jim walks through Ann Arbor's central campus plaza. He walks in and out of the undergraduate library and, then, in and out of the high-rise graduate library. Then he walks through an academic hall past classrooms.

EXT. STUDENT UNION BUILDING--DAY

Jim stands in front of the Student Union Building.

INT. STUDENT UNION BUILDING BOOKSTORE--DAY

Jim takes biographical book about Bob Dylan from a bookstore shelf and starts to read it in bookstore. (VOICE OVER) Dylan singing "Subterranean Homesick Blues" is heard over bookstore radio sound system. Jim stops reading book and puts book back on bookstore shelf.

Jim walks past students who are browsing in the bookstore. A young woman cashier, dressed in overalls and a work shirt, smiles at him. Jim smiles back at her as he exits from the bookstore.

INT. FRONT OF STUDENT UNION RIDE BOARD--DAY

Jim pauses in front of the ride board. He glances under the "Ohio" ride offerings section. Looks in the "Rides To Kent, Ohio" mini-pocket folder, but finds no ride offerings.

Monday, April 27, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (v)

INT. SUPER'S LIVING ROOM -- DAY

Kelly and Maloney stand next to TONY THE SUPER, 62.

TONY THE SUPER: Like I say. Greenberg lived in apartment 2D for a few years. But that ain't Greenberg in the picture. Greenberg was a long-haired hippie-type. A long-haired hippie-type.

EXT. TOLEDO RAILROAD STATION -- DAY

JIM, 23, a thin long-haired hippie-type with a beard, stands on sidewalk. He's dressed in shabby khaki Army jacket, worn-out blue jeans, second-hand army boots and a stocking cap. And he carries a duffle bag and a worn-out guitar case.

Jim walks across street to Toledo bus station.

INT. TOLEDO BUS STATION -- DAY

Jim buys ticket, puts duffle bag and guitar case below bus, and boards bus. "Ann Arbor" is indicated as bus' destination.

INT. BUS -- DAY

Jim takes a window seat. Just before bus pulls out of station a woman STUDENT, 19, wearing jeans and winter coat rushes onto the bus. She takes the aisle seat next to Jim.

JIM: You're lucky you made the bus.

STUDENT: My dad couldn't start his car before he dropped me off.

JIM: How far you goin'?

STUDENT: Ann Arbor.

JIM: That's where I'm goin'. But I've never been there before.

STUDENT: Are you going to school there now?

JIM: No. I was tired of living in New York City. So I looked on the map and decided--since I never was in Ann Arbor--that Ann Arbor was the place to move to.

Sunday, April 26, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (iv)

INT. LIVING ROOM -- DAY

Apartment is sparsely furnished. MRS. BERNSTEIN, 72 and petite, stands in living room. Maloney and Kelly search apartment quickly.

MALONEY: How do folks like you expect us to protect you from muggers and rapists, if you won't cooperate with us when we knock on your doors?

MRS. BERNSTEIN: Any mugger or rapist can knock on the door. And say they're from the FBI.

MR. BERNSTEIN: What do you want us to do?

KELLY: We want you to look at these photographs of Greenberg and some Weather fugitives.

MR. BERNSTEIN: What do you mean by "Weather fugitives"?

KELLY: They're people we're looking for who are armed. And very dangerous. Greenberg is helping them out.

Kelly shows them photograph.

C.U. OF H.S. YEARBOOK PICTURE OF CLEAN-SHAVEN MAN.

KELLY (V.O.): Have you ever seen him?

MR. BERNSTEIN (V.O.): No. Never saw him.

MRS. BERNSTEIN (V.O.): No. He's so young.

C.U. OF A DIFFERENT YOUNG MAN.

KELLY (V.O.): How about him? Have you ever seen him?

MR.BERNSTEIN (V.O.): Yeah. I think I saw this guy on TV.

MRS. BERNSTEIN (V.O.): That's right, Max. He was on TV.

MALONEY: But did you ever see him in this building?

MRS. BERNSTEIN: No. Never saw him here.

C.U. OF A YOUNG WOMAN

KELLY (V.O.): What about her?

MRS. BERNSTEIN (V.O.): She's so pretty.

KELLY (V.O.): Have you seen her in this building?

MR. BERNSTEIN (V.O.): No. Never saw her before.

MRS. BERNSTEIN (V.O.): No.

MALONEY: Which apartment does the Super live in?

MR. BERNSTEIN: On the first floor.

MALONEY (turns to Kelly): Let's speak to the Super.

Maloney and Kelly turn to leave the apartment.

MR. BERNSTEIN: Sorry we couldn't help you more.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (iii)

MALONEY (CONT'D): Wait! Sombebody's coming.

Kelly and Maloney back away from door. Kelly draws his gun again. MR. BERNSTEIN, 78, appears at the end of the hallway. Mr. Bernstein wears a workingman's cap,walks slowly and carries a small bag of groceries and newspaper. He stops suddenly when he notices the guns pointed at him. Kelly and Maloney put guns back in their holsters.

KELLY: We're from the FBI. We want to look inside your apartment.

Kelly flashes his FBI I.D. at Mr. Bernstein.

MR. BERNSTEIN (slight Yiddish accent): FBI? My apartment? Why my apartment?

MALONEY: We're looking for James Greenberg. He lives in this apartment. He knows where the Weather fugitives are.

MR. BERNSTEIN: My wife and me live here. We just moved here from Pelham Parkway. My name is Bernstein. Not Greenberg.

MALONEY: Then let us look inside. If Greenberg doesn't live here, why doesn't she open the door?

Mr. Bernstein unlocks the door, leads Kelly and Maloney into apartment.

MR. BERNSTEIN: She never opens the door to anyone. It might be a mugger. Or a rapist.

Friday, April 24, 2009

The Fugitive Generation (ii)

INT. HALL OUTSIDE APT. 2D -- DAY

Kelly knocks on door. Maloney covers him from behind. The peephole on door opens.

KELLY: We're from the FBI. We'd like to speak with you.

MRS. BERNSTEIN (O.S.)(elderly voice, slight Yiddish accent): What do you want?

KELLY: We want to speak to James Greenberg.

MRS. BERNSTEIN: (O.S.): He don't live here. Go away.

Maloney steps closer to door.

MALONEY: Open the door. We want to look inside.

Mrs. Bernstein makes no further response. Maloney and Kelly look at each other, with guns still drawn. Maloney nods. Kelly puts his gun in holster and starts to pick lock.

The Fugitive Generation (i)

FADE IN:

EXT. BRONX STREET -- DAY

January 1972. Two FBI agents, MALONEY, 45, and KELLY, 31, sit in car and watch the slum apartment building that's across the deserted side street.

INT. CAR--DAY

MALONEY: Let's look inside.

EXT. BRONX STREET -- DAY

Maloney and Kelly get out of car, cross street, cautiously approach apartment building.

INT. BUILDING HALL -- DAY

Maloney and Kelly draw guns, walk up stairs to second floor. Cautiously, they make their way down the long hall to door of Apt. 2D.